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   The covered bridge at Bloomfield, built in 1917, is 45 meters long and can support up to 15 tons. It is fairly high at one end and opens to a large, low-lying marsh at the other end. As the melt water gushes seaward in the spring the marsh submerges for days.   It used to be impossible for children to cross the bridge on their way to school. One year, when the water was especially high, special arrangements were made to transport the students. A man who lived on the far side of the river had a sturdy boat. The school officials kept a bell on a box at the distant end of the old covered bridge, and when the children arrived they would ring the bell. When the man heard the bell he would come and get them in his boat and take them across the river. Playground fights were common that year, because the other children were jealous of the students who lived across the river for being able to leave a half-hour early.

 

 

The covered bridge over Moosehorn Creek is another that has its original cedar shingled roof. However in 1995-96 it underwent a refinishing project to preserve this important era of our history. This initiative was supervised by the League for Rural Renewal under the supervision of Mr. James Neals. The Department of Transport wanted to use new lumber, but much to Mr. Neals’ insistence, aged boards were found from an old barn, the perfect enhancement in keeping with the weathered, rustic look. Moosehorn was the first covered bridge in New Brunswick to be restored as the focal point of a small picnic park between old and new roads.

 

    Smith Creek No. 5 was built on the Oldfield family property at Newtown, hence the local name Oldfield Bridge. Before the bridge was built, local farmers forged a trail to this crossing on Smith Creek, traversing the water to take their grain to the Oldfield Grist Mill. The same route was traveled in the winter to cut blocks of ice in the mill pond. In 1910 the bridge was built on the same path. It is famous for the sketch that vacationing Ronald Lambert of Oshawa, Ontario drew of it. This sketch ended up on a 1992 commemorative coin, minted for the Canada 125 celebrations.
     Milkish Inlet, or Bayswater, was built in 1920. It consists of two spans of 33 meters each, totaling 66 metres long. " Milkish" is an old Indian name which means "the place where food is dried". Permission had to be granted from Ottawa before bridge construction could begin because any structure over waters that may be used by large boats must meet the requirements of the Federal Navigable Waters Act.
  The next bridge on the river, Kennebecasis River No.9 or Plumwesweep Bridge, was built in 1911. It was upgraded in the summer of 1974 by the League for Rural Renewal because of numerous gaps in the sidings. It is located on Plumsweep Road at Sussex. Plumwesweep is an old Indian name, one of the few that were used for covered bridges in memory of the Micmacs and Maliseets who roamed the waterways and made the portage trails that grew into by-roads and into today’s highways.
 Hammond River No. 2, otherwise known as French Village Bridge, is one of the longest remaining covered bridges in Kings County at 57 metres long. Built in 1912, it overlooks favorite swimming and fishing holes where speckled trout and silver salmon harbor in fresh water. In the summer it is the site of a busy campground at French Village.

Bloomfield
A beautiful rural community, about halfway between Norton and Hampton, on Route 1.
 

BLOOMFIELD CREEK
At Bloomfield on Bloomfield Station Road, off Centennial Road, off Rte. 1.
Built in 1917. Length 44.5m (146')

 

Darlings Island
One of the smallest islands in the Kennebecasis River, visitors quickly agree it is a dear place to visit. Nestled on the doorstep of neighbouring Hampton, it is a quiet corner and a favorite getaway for locals and visitors alike.
 

At Nauwigewauk on Darlings Island Road, off Station Loop Road, off Rte. 100.
Built in 1914. Length 41.7m (137')
 

 

Grand Bay-Westfield
Tel: (506) 738-6400 Fax (506) 738-6424
Town of Grand Bay-Westfield , P.O. Box 3001, Grand Bay-Westfield, NB E5K 4V3
http://www.town.grandbay-westfield.nb.ca/

 

Milkish Inlet, or Bayswater, consists of two spans of 33 meters each, totaling 66 metres long. "Milkish" is an old Indian name which means "the place where food is dried". Permission had to be granted from Ottawa before bridge construction could begin because any structure over waters that may be used by large boats must meet the requirements of the Federal Navigable Waters Act.

MILKISH INLET #1 (Bayswater)
At Bayswater on Rte. 845, turn right off Hardings Point Road
at the Westfield ferry. Built in 1920. 2 spans at 31.4m (103')

 

Hampton
Tel: (506) 832-6065 Fax: (506) 832-6098
Town of Hampton, P.O. Box 1066, Hampton, NB E5N 8H1
Email: hampton@nbnbet.nb.ca
http://hamptonacc.freeservers.com/index.html 

The Town of Hampton is located on the Kennebecasis River in southwestern New Brunswick, 37 km northeast of the city of Saint John. It is a small, friendly community with many points of interest and natural beauty. With its unspoiled environment and striking scenery, Hampton offers an abundance of opportunities that appeal to all ages.
Hampton, as Shiretown of Kings County, is rich in history, heritage and culture. The County Courthouse dates back to the early 1870's and still houses the well-preserved court and registry office. The Gaol is also a historic building which houses part of the Kings County Museum. Hampton heritage homes date back to the arrival of the Loyalists and reflect cultural ties to New England.

 

 

Kingston Peninsula
The reasons people live on the Kingston Peninsula are numerous. Convenience isn’t one of them.

Its residents have an island mentality, with its three sides bordered by the Kennebecasis River to the East, Grand Bay at the tip, and with Long Reach becoming Belleisle Bay on the Western shore. These water barriers have to be crossed by one of the leisurely cable ferries, or residents face a long drive when heading outside peninsula borders.

While here, make sure to enjoy a refreshing cup of tea at the historic 1810 Carter House. The even older 1789 Trinity Church began as Georgian in design and welcomes visitors as one of the signature structures of the area.


The Peninsula is the Sunday drive and stop for tea, the vacation in a cottage, a get-away weekend, or the Saturday morning farmers market run.

Mixed with the boating, swimming, sea-do and snowmobile generation of activities there is the gentler enjoyment of meandering the country roads, enjoying the picturesque vistas and the area’s Loyalist legacy.

While here, make sure to enjoy a refreshing cup of tea at the historic 1810 Carter House. The even older 1789 Trinity Church began as Georgian in design and welcomes visitors as one of the signature structures of the area

 

 

Norton
Tel: (506) 839-3011 Fax: (506) 839-3015
Village of Norton, Main Street, P.O. Box 335, Norton, NB E5T 1J7
Email: vnorton@nbnet.nb.ca

Hometown of the country music sensation Chris Cummings.
 

MOOSEHORN CREEK #1.5
Beside Rte. 1 near Norton. (Not in Service)
Built in 1915. Length 28.9m (94' 8")

 

Quispamsis
Tel: (506) 849-5778 Fax: (506) 849-5799
Town of Quispamsis, P.O. Box 21085, 12 Landing Court, Quispamsis, NB E2E 4Z4
www.quispamsis.ca 
A proudly rural community on the western shore of the Kennebecasis River.
 

HAMMOND RIVER #2 (French Village)
On Rte. 860 at French Village, off French Village Road,
off Stock Farm Road, off Rte. 100 in the Town of Quispamsis.
Built in 1912. Length 55.2m (181')

 

HAMMOND RIVER #3 (Smithtown)
On Damascus Road at Smithtown, off Rte. 860, off French Village Road,
off Stock Farm Road, off Rte. 100 in the Town of Quispamsis.
Built in 1914. Length 55.7m (182' 9"
 

 

Rothesay
Tel: (506) 848-6600 Fax: (506) 848-6677
Town of Rothesay, 70 Hampton Road, Rothesay, NB E2E 5L5
http://www.town.rothesay.nb.ca/

Situated in the beautiful Kennebecasis Valley, the town of Rothesay was so named in August, 1860 at the request of the Prince of Wales, who was later to become King Edward VII. The Prince said the area reminded him of Rothesay, Bute, in Scotland. The name Kennebecasis is thought to be derived from the Micmac "Kenepekachiachk", meaning "little long bay place".

 

Rothesay is primarily a residential community and is well known for its people and quality of life. Among its more famous citizens was W. Rupert Turnbull ("Rupsie"), the inventor of the variable-pitch propeller. He is featured in the Aviation Museum in Ottawa for his aeronautical advances, but in Rothesay he is sometimes remembered for advocating sailing instruction for the young, playing tennis and for serving extraordinarily tough duck to his dinner guests.

Rothesay is a vibrant suburban community that has something to offer children and adults of all ages. It is a newly expanded town and its citizens are proud of its location, heritage and quality of life.

 

 

 

Sussex
Tel: (506) 432-4540 Fax: (506) 432-4566
Town of Sussex, 524 Main St., Sussex, NB, Canada E4E 3E4
Email: townman@nbnet.nb.ca 
www.sussex.ca

This community offers a relaxed pace of life, friendly people and a lifestyle bound by the land. Its history goes back to Loyalist times and the people are descendants of farmers, woodsmen, miners, merchants and even ship captains.


Sussex is at the junction of the Fundy Coastal Drive and the River Valley Scenic Drive. So much to see and do. Make Sussex your home-away-from-home and enjoy day trips to Magnetic Hill, the Hopewell Rocks, Fundy National Park and the Fundy Trail Parkway; to name a few. Also, Sussex is the central location between Saint John, Moncton and Fredericton – each about an hour away.

 

Enjoy everything at your leisure from antique and craft shops to outdoor cafes and even the oldest livestock auction in Atlantic Canada. Visit the Agricultural Museum of New Brunswick on Perry Street and the Sussex Museum, Gallery & Tea Room on Maple Avenue. You won't want to miss the NB Antique Auto Giant Flea Market in August or the Atlantic Balloon Fiesta in September.

 

 

BELLEISLE CREEK #2 (Marven)
On Swamp Road near Belleisle Creek, off Rte. 870, off Rte. 10.
Built in 1903. Length 21.6m (71')
 

 

KENNEBECASIS RIVER #7.5 (Salmon)
At Sussex, beside Rte. 890, off Rte. 2. (Not in Service)
Built in 1908. Length 34.2m (112' 2")
 

 

KENNEBECASIS RIVER #9 (Plumweseep)
At Sussex, on Plumweseep Road, off Rte. 114, off Rte. 2.
Built in 1911. Length 22.5m (74')
 

 

KENNEBECASIS RIVER #23 (Malone)
At Goshen, on Goshen Road, off Rte. 114, off Rte. 2 near Sussex.
Built in 1911. Length 17.7m (58')
 

 

MILLSTREAM RIVER #5 (Centreville)
On Pleasant Ridge Branch Road, at Centreville, off Rte. 880,
off Rte. 2 at Berwick. Built in 1911. Length 28.9m (95')
 

SMITH CREEK #1 (Tranton)
At Sussex, on Roachville Road, off Rte. 890, off Rte. 2.
Built in 1927. Length 36.7m (120' 6")
 

SMITH CREEK #5 (Oldfield)
At Newtown, on Oldfield Road, off Rte. 890, off Rte. 2 at Sussex.
Built in 1910. Length 28m (92'). In 1992, this bridge was pictured
on the first 25 cent coin featured in a series to mark the
125th anniversary of Confederation!

 

Sussex Corner
Tel: (506) 433-5184 Fax: (506) 433-3785
Village of Sussex Corner, 1179 Post Road, Sussex Corner, NB E4E 2X7
E-Mail: sussex.corner@nb.aibn.com
www.sussexcorner.com/

Sussex Corner was originally known as "Pleasant Valley"; a name it shared with the areas of Roachville, Sussex and Dutch Valley. It is thought that this name was chosen because the land seemed to be "nestled in a valley" away from harsh winds and storms.

 

Those traveling from Saint John to Chegnecto would often travel this route along the Saint John and Kenebecasis either by horseback or canoe, thus avoiding the rough waters and harsh winds of the Bay of Fundy.

In 1792, the name changed from "Pleasant Valley" to "Sussex Vale". As the population began to grow, it became a vital link in the trading route from Chegnecto along the Petitcodiac, Anagance and Kennebecasis rivers to Saint John. Sussex Vale became the stop over place for travelers and traders using this route and was, at one time, a very bustling area. In fact, as horses began to be replaced by the more efficient steam engine, plans were drawn for a railway from Moncton to Saint John. It would have gone right through Sussex Corner, a move that would have further encouraged growth, but several land-owners refused to sell the land required. The railway had to be re-routed through Sussex and was built between 1853-1859. This caused the business district to shift from Sussex Corner to Sussex so that it could be nearer to the railway terminal.

 

 

TROUT CREEK #4 (Urney)
Near Poley Mountain, on Urney Road, off Waterford Road,
off Rte. 111 at Sussex Corner. Built in 1905. Length 20.1m (66')
 

TROUT CREEK #5 (Moores Mills)
At Poley Mountain, on Drummond Road, off Waterford Road, off Rte. 111
at Sussex Corner. Built in 1923. Length 17.8m (58' 6")
 

WARD'S CREEK #2 (MacFarlane)
On Church Road at Upper Wards Creek, off Rte. 111, off Rte. 2
at Sussex Corner. Built in 1909. Length 17.7m (58')
 

 

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